Lee Ann Dodson
Lee Ann Dodson
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Flowering

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Vertical Funnel No 3

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Entwined

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Right Down the Highway

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Purple Menace

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One Within the Other

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Double Trouble

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Imminent Threat

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Steel Creek IV

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Winter Nocturne I

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Upriver from Steel Creek

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Waterfall II

About Lee Ann Dodson

Lee Ann Dodson grew up in Fayetteville, AR but has lived the majority of her adult life in both Oregon and Florida. She recently returned to her roots in the Ozark Mountains where she is a prolific oil painter of the natural beauty in the surrounding landscapes of her youth. Dodson’s style is painterly yet realistic; impressionistic in the details that create a very photorealistic whole. While in her early twenties, Dodson spent six months in Japan where she was smitten by the art, architecture, and the Eastern aesthetic. This led to years of painting Koi in various gardens, including her own. Heavily influenced by the Impressionists and Post Impressionists she continued to paint and draw in a realistic manner with a focus on naturalism. Lee Ann had the extraordinary opportunity to become the first artist in residence in the fledgling Arts in Medicine Program at the University of Florida’s College of Medicine. Her work with cancer patients, families and staff reinforced her own experience with the healing properties of art in its many varied forms. Dodson’s second child was born with Down syndrome and she drew upon her art skills to create bridges between the community of children with developmental disabilities and the community at large. Dodson says, “Nature is healing and so is art. To paint a realistic image of nature one must deconstruct it into all its bits in order to reconstruct it on canvas or paper. This labor intensive process of mark making is how I truly learn to know a place and find peace."

In April, 2019 I spent several hours in the tornado shelter behind my house. It is so quiet in there-and dark, womb-like. After emerging later that night I caught a short clip of the news showing a reddish funnel with an almost golden dust cloud. I was struck by the intensity of the colors. Our world is in danger. The environment is threatened by our ever expanding and all too often destructive presence. More extreme weather events are happening, including an increase in the intensity and frequency of tornadoes."In April, 2019 I spent several hours in the tornado shelter behind my house. It is so quiet in there-and dark, womb-like. After emerging later that night I caught a short clip of the news showing a reddish funnel with an almost golden dust cloud. I was struck by the intensity of the colors. They are not well understood; these volatile, frightening, elusive, deadly vortices that are eerily beautiful. I’ve been putting spirals and vortexes into my paintings for years but only now tornadoes. They reflect my own inner turmoil and that huge storm into which we are all being swept.

About the art

Lee Ann Dodson grew up in Fayetteville, AR but has lived the majority of her adult life in both Oregon and Florida. She recently returned to her roots in the Ozark Mountains where she is a prolific oil painter of the natural beauty in the surrounding landscapes of her youth. Dodson’s style is painterly yet realistic; impressionistic in the details that create a very photorealistic whole. While in her early twenties, Dodson spent six months in Japan where she was smitten by the art, architecture, and the Eastern aesthetic. This led to years of painting Koi in various gardens, including her own. Heavily influenced by the Impressionists and Post Impressionists she continued to paint and draw in a realistic manner with a focus on naturalism. Lee Ann had the extraordinary opportunity to become the first artist in residence in the fledgling Arts in Medicine Program at the University of Florida’s College of Medicine. Her work with cancer patients, families and staff reinforced her own experience with the healing properties of art in its many varied forms. Dodson’s second child was born with Down syndrome and she drew upon her art skills to create bridges between the community of children with developmental disabilities and the community at large. Dodson says, “Nature is healing and so is art. To paint a realistic image of nature one must deconstruct it into all its bits in order to reconstruct it on canvas or paper. This labor intensive process of mark making is how I truly learn to know a place and find peace."

In April, 2019 I spent several hours in the tornado shelter behind my house. It is so quiet in there-and dark, womb-like. After emerging later that night I caught a short clip of the news showing a reddish funnel with an almost golden dust cloud. I was struck by the intensity of the colors. Our world is in danger. The environment is threatened by our ever expanding and all too often destructive presence. More extreme weather events are happening, including an increase in the intensity and frequency of tornadoes."In April, 2019 I spent several hours in the tornado shelter behind my house. It is so quiet in there-and dark, womb-like. After emerging later that night I caught a short clip of the news showing a reddish funnel with an almost golden dust cloud. I was struck by the intensity of the colors. They are not well understood; these volatile, frightening, elusive, deadly vortices that are eerily beautiful. I’ve been putting spirals and vortexes into my paintings for years but only now tornadoes. They reflect my own inner turmoil and that huge storm into which we are all being swept.