Jessica Mongeon
Jessica Mongeon
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Mind Forest II

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Mind Forest I

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Dendritic Stream

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Dendritic Tree

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River and Lace

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I Found Myself Within a Forest Dark

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The Revelation of Joshua

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Cyanolichen

About Jessica Mongeon

Jessica Mongeon is a professional artist whose acrylic paintings examine systems of nature and environmental issues. She was born in Rolette, North Dakota and currently lives in Ozark, Arkansas. She earned a Master of Fine Arts in Painting from Montana State University, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of North Dakota. Artist residencies that she has attended include Vermont Studio Center, the Anderson Center at Tower View, and the Sam and Adele Golden Foundation. Jessica has shown her artwork nationally and internationally, including group exhibitions at The Painting Center in New York, NY, the Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts at the University of Alabama, and 203 Art Gallery, Shanghai, China. Recent solo exhibitions were hosted by the Helen E. Copeland Gallery, Bozeman, MT and the EACC Fine Arts Center in Forrest City, AR. She works as an Assistant Professor of Art and Foundations Coordinator at Arkansas Tech University..

My paintings are an invitation to encounter nature through the lens of my experiences and imagination. I often include circular brushstrokes that evoke the striations found in mushrooms, geodes, bisected tree trunks, or shells. That mark is both a reference to natural organisms, and a record of an action, bringing me the same joy that comes from a child drawing with a handful of markers or crayons. I use an absorbent ground on canvas or paper, adding layers of fluid paint to create a sense of mystery and depth. The colors blend in a way that can be unpredictable, evolving as they dry on the surface. I am fascinated by the visual similarities found in nature, including within the human body. For example, a branching fractal pattern can be found in human veins, neurons, tree branches, river deltas, and lichen. By combining these observations, I demonstrate how humans and nature are interconnected.

About the art

Jessica Mongeon is a professional artist whose acrylic paintings examine systems of nature and environmental issues. She was born in Rolette, North Dakota and currently lives in Ozark, Arkansas. She earned a Master of Fine Arts in Painting from Montana State University, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of North Dakota. Artist residencies that she has attended include Vermont Studio Center, the Anderson Center at Tower View, and the Sam and Adele Golden Foundation. Jessica has shown her artwork nationally and internationally, including group exhibitions at The Painting Center in New York, NY, the Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts at the University of Alabama, and 203 Art Gallery, Shanghai, China. Recent solo exhibitions were hosted by the Helen E. Copeland Gallery, Bozeman, MT and the EACC Fine Arts Center in Forrest City, AR. She works as an Assistant Professor of Art and Foundations Coordinator at Arkansas Tech University..

My paintings are an invitation to encounter nature through the lens of my experiences and imagination. I often include circular brushstrokes that evoke the striations found in mushrooms, geodes, bisected tree trunks, or shells. That mark is both a reference to natural organisms, and a record of an action, bringing me the same joy that comes from a child drawing with a handful of markers or crayons. I use an absorbent ground on canvas or paper, adding layers of fluid paint to create a sense of mystery and depth. The colors blend in a way that can be unpredictable, evolving as they dry on the surface. I am fascinated by the visual similarities found in nature, including within the human body. For example, a branching fractal pattern can be found in human veins, neurons, tree branches, river deltas, and lichen. By combining these observations, I demonstrate how humans and nature are interconnected.