Eric Andre
Eric Andre
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Inside Out

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Systemic Punches

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The Fear of Steps

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Untitled_Mpae obi apampamu abre a wonsa hye namum

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Trash

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The Sound of My Motherland

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Battlefield

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Visible Unseen

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The Trap

Gallery Reserve - For Viewing Only

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The Pulling of a Trigger

About Eric Andre

Eric Andre is an interdisciplinary artist born and raised in Akumadan, Ghana. In 2010, he graduated from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), with a Bachelor of Arts in Industrial Arts, majoring in ceramics. Currently, he is a second year MFA student in ceramics at the University of Arkansas School of Art. His works encapsulate both the functional and conceptual through sculpture pieces, fountains, souvenirs, vases, and mixed-media artifacts. These works deliberate on underrepresented cultural, political, and socioeconomic issues. His current body of work creates new narratives about displacement, vulnerability and negotiation in the context of space, border, migration, immigration, and identity construction.

The politics of space and borders in the colonial and postcolonial era as well as the relationships of transnational communities to spaces they occupy continue to play an essential role in shaping our world today. The political context of these spaces is often shaped by the sociocultural, sociopolitical, and socioeconomic conditions that are present in those places. As a result, how we negotiate these spaces become complicated, displacing, and attracting a variety of interpretations of systems that control the way people live, work, and relate to one another within and beyond boundaries. My artistic research currently uses African proverbs as a lens in the process of developing a new narrative about displacement and how that informs vulnerability and negotiation in the context of space, border, migration, immigration, and identity construction. Proverbs usually are abstract in form; in other words, they cannot be seen or touched, so I am interested in concretizing them for people to not only hear, but also see, touch, and experience in diverse ways.

About the art

Eric Andre is an interdisciplinary artist born and raised in Akumadan, Ghana. In 2010, he graduated from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), with a Bachelor of Arts in Industrial Arts, majoring in ceramics. Currently, he is a second year MFA student in ceramics at the University of Arkansas School of Art. His works encapsulate both the functional and conceptual through sculpture pieces, fountains, souvenirs, vases, and mixed-media artifacts. These works deliberate on underrepresented cultural, political, and socioeconomic issues. His current body of work creates new narratives about displacement, vulnerability and negotiation in the context of space, border, migration, immigration, and identity construction.

The politics of space and borders in the colonial and postcolonial era as well as the relationships of transnational communities to spaces they occupy continue to play an essential role in shaping our world today. The political context of these spaces is often shaped by the sociocultural, sociopolitical, and socioeconomic conditions that are present in those places. As a result, how we negotiate these spaces become complicated, displacing, and attracting a variety of interpretations of systems that control the way people live, work, and relate to one another within and beyond boundaries. My artistic research currently uses African proverbs as a lens in the process of developing a new narrative about displacement and how that informs vulnerability and negotiation in the context of space, border, migration, immigration, and identity construction. Proverbs usually are abstract in form; in other words, they cannot be seen or touched, so I am interested in concretizing them for people to not only hear, but also see, touch, and experience in diverse ways.