Rani Leia Bondhus
Rani Leia Bondhus
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Make Room For Me

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Finding Marbles

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Red and Green

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Lucky Stars

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ThInk About It

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Art of Mending

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Fishy

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Art Heals

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Winter Flowers

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Fleeting Moments

Magnet gum drops

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Time in a Bottle

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Alien Eggs

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Stars

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Portholes

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Bubblegum Crisis Averted

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In the Dark

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Closeness

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TBD

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Robot Love

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Three Orbs

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Dream Catcher

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Window View

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Bubbles

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Florescents

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Heart Necklace

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Happy Sun

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Cut the Cake

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Quilted

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BEE

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Bill Clinton High

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Expression

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Sunny

Gallery Reserve

For Viewing Only

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Blood Moon

About Rani Leia Bondhus

Represented Artist

In 1982, a 4-year-old Rani got to use chocolate pudding as finger paint, and found her calling. Growing up, she excelled in many art forms, including singing and dancing. After graduating from graphic design school, she moved to LA to pursue acting while working as a graphic designer. Then everything changed. While choreographing a dance one day, her heart stopped. Unbeknownst to her, there was a huge hole in it. After surgery, she was a whole different person, struggling to cope with mental health disorders. She started using oil paints, and since 2003, has found them to be the most soothing medium. She paints for the healing effects of the process. She loves how the transparency of oils can create powerful color depths with layers. Its ability to keep shape is also one of her favorite fascinating elements. Hesitant in the past to share her work, she managed to hang a piece in MIA for “Foot in the Door 4”, and has hung her work at multiple Minneapolis locations. In 2017, she had 48 paintings hanging in SIBA, in St. Louis, for a solo show. Now, her dream is to share the healing effects of her work with others, to be a more positive part of society.

Through art I seek to normalize mental health issues and spread the word about the DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) skill of non-judgmental thinking. Mental health used to be so taboo, but maintaining mental health is for anyone with a brain (which is everyone). After waking up from unexpected heart surgery, to repair a silver-dollar sized hole in my heart, my brain was in a traumatized state of panic for years and felt disconnected from my body. But by incorporating DBT skills into my painting styles, learning to approach the canvas and my process with non-judgmental thinking, I found a certain kind of peace. I continue to practice those skills while painting and hope the effects of that skill set are reflected in my work and in the minds of my audience.

Rather than creating from inspiration, I first and foremost create from therapeutic necessity. I seek to make peace with my own mind and reconnect with my body. I hope my artwork helps create a safe space for dialogue about mental health issues. I do believe these works can help soothe your brain, if you stare at any one of them long enough.

About the art

In 1982, a 4-year-old Rani got to use chocolate pudding as finger paint, and found her calling. Growing up, she excelled in many art forms, including singing and dancing. After graduating from graphic design school, she moved to LA to pursue acting while working as a graphic designer. Then everything changed. While choreographing a dance one day, her heart stopped. Unbeknownst to her, there was a huge hole in it. After surgery, she was a whole different person, struggling to cope with mental health disorders. She started using oil paints, and since 2003, has found them to be the most soothing medium. She paints for the healing effects of the process. She loves how the transparency of oils can create powerful color depths with layers. Its ability to keep shape is also one of her favorite fascinating elements. Hesitant in the past to share her work, she managed to hang a piece in MIA for “Foot in the Door 4”, and has hung her work at multiple Minneapolis locations. In 2017, she had 48 paintings hanging in SIBA, in St. Louis, for a solo show. Now, her dream is to share the healing effects of her work with others, to be a more positive part of society.

Through art I seek to normalize mental health issues and spread the word about the DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) skill of non-judgmental thinking. Mental health used to be so taboo, but maintaining mental health is for anyone with a brain (which is everyone). After waking up from unexpected heart surgery, to repair a silver-dollar sized hole in my heart, my brain was in a traumatized state of panic for years and felt disconnected from my body. But by incorporating DBT skills into my painting styles, learning to approach the canvas and my process with non-judgmental thinking, I found a certain kind of peace. I continue to practice those skills while painting and hope the effects of that skill set are reflected in my work and in the minds of my audience.

Rather than creating from inspiration, I first and foremost create from therapeutic necessity. I seek to make peace with my own mind and reconnect with my body. I hope my artwork helps create a safe space for dialogue about mental health issues. I do believe these works can help soothe your brain, if you stare at any one of them long enough.