Melissa Milton
Melissa Milton
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Uncaged

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Spilling

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Tossed

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Downward Glide

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The Wishing Tree

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Just Peachy

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Flora and Fauna

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Sunlit Swim

About Melissa Milton

Melissa Milton of Fayetteville, Arkansas is a painter. She holds a BA in English and a Juris Doctor in Law. Milton retired from law in 2016 she became disabled and took up painting in earnest in 2017 to combat the boredom of being forced to lie down most of her waking hours. She won a 2018 Rare Artist Award from the EveryLife Foundation. Milton is a Board Member and Social Media Chair for the Artists of Northwest Arkansas, as well as a member of Mensa where she has illustrated select Mensa Bulletin magazine short stories (September 2019). Milton’s work is collected throughout the United States and appeared in British Vogue Magazine in the Vogue Gallery of Artists in January 2020. Her work is available online through her website at www.melissamiltonart.com.

I was born during the 1960s and came of age in the groovy 1970s. The family of colors and designs associated with those eras frequently find their way into my artwork, especially in tertiary colors. I tend to use curved, relaxed, flowing shapes which - when combined with the unusual color choices - can potentially express an object in a new way. I also like to begin most of my paintings with either a story or a question I would like to visually depict. The questions are usually simple and often nonsensical. The stories, however, are about a memory, a philosophy, a fairy tale, or a forewarning. I paint while lying down for pragmatic reasons relating to my physical disabilities. For equally pragmatic reasons, I paint on a touchscreen using special paintbrushes and styluses it will recognize. Painting with wet paint while lying down would be akin to trying to eat spaghetti while lying down, so I opt to paint on a computer screen. I zoom in when I need to work in great detail with my styluses or brushes. When a painting is complete, I print it out on canvas using long- lasting inks. After it cures for at least 24 hours, I sit up and varnish it. After 2-3 days of the varnish drying, I then use some of my ‘sitting up time’ to wrap it around wooden stretcher bars and wire it for hanging. This is how I create my Limited Edition giclée canvas prints. As is typical of people with my neurological disease (dysautonomia), although I can only stand for a few short minutes on land I can stand for hours in the low gravity environment of water. It’s where I can move freely and almost normally. I spend a great deal of time in my therapy pool. The painted underwater photos which were taken in that pool obviously tie into it. The other art pieces are paintings either depicting fish swimming, a bird flying, a person gliding about on a bike, or else have fluid movement in the paintings style itself. Waterlike movement is definitely a recurring theme in my artwork.

About the art

Melissa Milton of Fayetteville, Arkansas is a painter. She holds a BA in English and a Juris Doctor in Law. Milton retired from law in 2016 she became disabled and took up painting in earnest in 2017 to combat the boredom of being forced to lie down most of her waking hours. She won a 2018 Rare Artist Award from the EveryLife Foundation. Milton is a Board Member and Social Media Chair for the Artists of Northwest Arkansas, as well as a member of Mensa where she has illustrated select Mensa Bulletin magazine short stories (September 2019). Milton’s work is collected throughout the United States and appeared in British Vogue Magazine in the Vogue Gallery of Artists in January 2020. Her work is available online through her website at www.melissamiltonart.com.

I was born during the 1960s and came of age in the groovy 1970s. The family of colors and designs associated with those eras frequently find their way into my artwork, especially in tertiary colors. I tend to use curved, relaxed, flowing shapes which - when combined with the unusual color choices - can potentially express an object in a new way. I also like to begin most of my paintings with either a story or a question I would like to visually depict. The questions are usually simple and often nonsensical. The stories, however, are about a memory, a philosophy, a fairy tale, or a forewarning. I paint while lying down for pragmatic reasons relating to my physical disabilities. For equally pragmatic reasons, I paint on a touchscreen using special paintbrushes and styluses it will recognize. Painting with wet paint while lying down would be akin to trying to eat spaghetti while lying down, so I opt to paint on a computer screen. I zoom in when I need to work in great detail with my styluses or brushes. When a painting is complete, I print it out on canvas using long- lasting inks. After it cures for at least 24 hours, I sit up and varnish it. After 2-3 days of the varnish drying, I then use some of my ‘sitting up time’ to wrap it around wooden stretcher bars and wire it for hanging. This is how I create my Limited Edition giclée canvas prints. As is typical of people with my neurological disease (dysautonomia), although I can only stand for a few short minutes on land I can stand for hours in the low gravity environment of water. It’s where I can move freely and almost normally. I spend a great deal of time in my therapy pool. The painted underwater photos which were taken in that pool obviously tie into it. The other art pieces are paintings either depicting fish swimming, a bird flying, a person gliding about on a bike, or else have fluid movement in the paintings style itself. Waterlike movement is definitely a recurring theme in my artwork.