Linda Sheets
Linda Sheets
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9 Little Houses

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6 Little Houses

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Little House Big City

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Cat Scratchin'

About Linda Sheets

Linda Sheets was born in Northern Indiana to a plumber and a nurse and created art of one kind or another for most of her life. The first of her family to attend college, she quit art school after two years to become a plumber. This led to a 25-year career as a contractor and plumber before retiring in 2003 to return to her one great love, making art. She licensed six of her designs in 2010 for use in beginner kits to the company that produces the scratchboard product that she used. Scratchboard, developed in the early twentieth century, primarily for use in graphic illustrating, has re-emerged as a viable fine art medium. The product is a rigid board coated with white kaolin clay, sprayed with black ink and scratched and cut with sharp tools to create an image that sometimes resembles a woodcut or etching. In 2012 she created two illustrated books of rescued animals and their stories, Dog Scratchin’ and Cat Scratchin’.

Linda Sheets' last statement about her work: "Life is just a series of activities and events. Simple as that. The first main event, our birth, the last, our death. In between weexperience the great and the mundane. The activity that brings me the greatest joy is creating art, making something from nothing, to create a visual record of a life experience.

"My most recent work has been inspired by my collection of vintage black and white photographs. I’m drawn to these orphans, these interesting images carefully placed in albums, but then discarded when there is no longer anyone who knows who they are, what activities they cared for, or how they lived. Over the years as I’ve gathered photos and albums that catch my eye at various estate and tag sale, I usually have no clue about who they are, so many are unidentified and lost to time. The most precious are those that have a date and/or name written on the back. The only thing I’m sure of is that they are long gone and those who knew and loved them are probably gone as well. In drawing them I try to imagine their story, or even to write a completely new one, to honor their existence in that specific, ephemeral, moment captured by film."

About the art

Linda Sheets was born in Northern Indiana to a plumber and a nurse and created art of one kind or another for most of her life. The first of her family to attend college, she quit art school after two years to become a plumber. This led to a 25-year career as a contractor and plumber before retiring in 2003 to return to her one great love, making art. She licensed six of her designs in 2010 for use in beginner kits to the company that produces the scratchboard product that she used. Scratchboard, developed in the early twentieth century, primarily for use in graphic illustrating, has re-emerged as a viable fine art medium. The product is a rigid board coated with white kaolin clay, sprayed with black ink and scratched and cut with sharp tools to create an image that sometimes resembles a woodcut or etching. In 2012 she created two illustrated books of rescued animals and their stories, Dog Scratchin’ and Cat Scratchin’.

Linda Sheets' last statement about her work: "Life is just a series of activities and events. Simple as that. The first main event, our birth, the last, our death. In between weexperience the great and the mundane. The activity that brings me the greatest joy is creating art, making something from nothing, to create a visual record of a life experience.

"My most recent work has been inspired by my collection of vintage black and white photographs. I’m drawn to these orphans, these interesting images carefully placed in albums, but then discarded when there is no longer anyone who knows who they are, what activities they cared for, or how they lived. Over the years as I’ve gathered photos and albums that catch my eye at various estate and tag sale, I usually have no clue about who they are, so many are unidentified and lost to time. The most precious are those that have a date and/or name written on the back. The only thing I’m sure of is that they are long gone and those who knew and loved them are probably gone as well. In drawing them I try to imagine their story, or even to write a completely new one, to honor their existence in that specific, ephemeral, moment captured by film."