Diana Hausam
Diana Hausam
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Silver

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Left Behind

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Innocence

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Waiting

About Diana Hausam

Diana Michelle Hausam earned her degree in Fine Art with an emphasis in darkroom photography and a Bachelor of Science in biology from the University of Arkansas. She is the recipient of the Arkansas Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts 2009 Annual Bibba Pruet Scholarship. She used the scholarship to purchase a large format film camera and document the old Gypsy Camp for Girls in rural Northwest Arkansas. She teaches photography and Photoshop at Northwest Technical Institute as well as the Eureka Springs School of the Arts and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. She displays her Fine Art at galleries and museums both locally and regionally and is a part of various personal collections. She directed the documentary short Westland about the reclusive outsider artist Tim West, which has aired on AETN and was a part of the 2014 PBS Online Film Festival and the Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival. She is currently working on the feature length documentary about Tim West. Diana was also one of 25 artists selected to participate in Artists Inc. 2020, an artist cohort hosted by the Mid America Arts Alliance. Her work can presently be seen through the traveling exhibit Small Works on Paper as well as The Art Collective Gallery in Rogers Arkansas. She has a studio at Mount Sequoyah Creative Spaces where she teaches students the art of photography.

Photography has been my artistic medium of choice for over twenty years. I have always sought the unusual and macabre which mimic my feelings and allow me to release pain. We all have pain; this is how I deal with it. It is a system that works, to seek and then release. Through searching and capturing my subjects I can move on. Because this series of photographs symbolically expose my loss and rediscovery, I have named this ongoing series “Darkness Through Light”.

My work has become more and more singular over the years where I now typically focus on one thing, no distractions. Take a hard look at what you see and try to understand me. The dirt and decay that attach itself to my subjects signify the darkness that surrounds us as humans. They are alive and damaged, and they all speak to me on this level. “Show me how to live” they say. “Show me where I belong”. I relate to every single one of my images.

My subjects beg to be noticed and I in turn celebrate their beauty and what they mean to me. I think they search for me as I search for them and when we are united it is relief and joy that comes to me. I find my voice through this collective muse of mine. Blood, sweat, tears…. fear, overcoming fear. It is an addiction. My work is very personal, and I believe this is evident in my art.

About the art

Diana Michelle Hausam earned her degree in Fine Art with an emphasis in darkroom photography and a Bachelor of Science in biology from the University of Arkansas. She is the recipient of the Arkansas Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts 2009 Annual Bibba Pruet Scholarship. She used the scholarship to purchase a large format film camera and document the old Gypsy Camp for Girls in rural Northwest Arkansas. She teaches photography and Photoshop at Northwest Technical Institute as well as the Eureka Springs School of the Arts and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. She displays her Fine Art at galleries and museums both locally and regionally and is a part of various personal collections. She directed the documentary short Westland about the reclusive outsider artist Tim West, which has aired on AETN and was a part of the 2014 PBS Online Film Festival and the Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival. She is currently working on the feature length documentary about Tim West. Diana was also one of 25 artists selected to participate in Artists Inc. 2020, an artist cohort hosted by the Mid America Arts Alliance. Her work can presently be seen through the traveling exhibit Small Works on Paper as well as The Art Collective Gallery in Rogers Arkansas. She has a studio at Mount Sequoyah Creative Spaces where she teaches students the art of photography.

Photography has been my artistic medium of choice for over twenty years. I have always sought the unusual and macabre which mimic my feelings and allow me to release pain. We all have pain; this is how I deal with it. It is a system that works, to seek and then release. Through searching and capturing my subjects I can move on. Because this series of photographs symbolically expose my loss and rediscovery, I have named this ongoing series “Darkness Through Light”.

My work has become more and more singular over the years where I now typically focus on one thing, no distractions. Take a hard look at what you see and try to understand me. The dirt and decay that attach itself to my subjects signify the darkness that surrounds us as humans. They are alive and damaged, and they all speak to me on this level. “Show me how to live” they say. “Show me where I belong”. I relate to every single one of my images.

My subjects beg to be noticed and I in turn celebrate their beauty and what they mean to me. I think they search for me as I search for them and when we are united it is relief and joy that comes to me. I find my voice through this collective muse of mine. Blood, sweat, tears…. fear, overcoming fear. It is an addiction. My work is very personal, and I believe this is evident in my art.